Policy Memos by Arkady Moshes

Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

In the aftermath of the April 2008 North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit, there is a need to conceptually rethink the Euro-Atlantic agenda in post-Soviet Eastern Europe and the Caucasus. The...

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Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012
When Vladimir Putin proposed visa-free travel between Russia and the European Union in August 2002, his initiative seemed to be sailing against the current wave of thinking. The...
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Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012
It is obvious that the epoch of Leonid Kuchma in Ukraine is coming to its end. When and how this epoch will end and what, let alone who, will follow Kuchma is still extremely uncertain. ...
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Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

On January 1, 2002, Ukraine officially enters a campaign to elect the country’s new legislature, the Verkhovna Rada. The elections that will take place on March 31 are widely viewed as being especially important because in 2004, during the term of the next Rada, Ukrainian president Leonid Kuchma...

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Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

Russia’s Belarus dilemma can be formulated as two questions. Should Moscow continue the process of political integration with Belarus--which necessarily entails interaction with and support of the regime of President Aleksandr Lukashenko--in order to enjoy certain...

Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

An analysis of the implications for Russia of European Union (EU) enlargement to include Poland and the Baltic states should give Russia cause for alarm. This memo explains why, at this point, the anticipated effects seem predominantly negative.

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Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

Russian policy towards Ukraine, Belarus, and the Baltic States depends primarily on domestic factors. Western influence is important in terms of setting well-known limits for what Russia should not do, rather than affecting decision-making on what it should. Compared...

Arkady Moshes 07-23-2012

At the moment, the dynamics of Russian-Ukrainian relations are defined by two sets of contradictory trends. On the one hand, Russia and Ukraine are obviously drifting apart. On the other hand, the centrifugal process has its limits, making a "final divorce" impossible for the foreseeable future...

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About the author

Director,The EU Eastern Neighbourhood and Russia Programme
Finnish Institute of International Affairs