Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 548
Scott Radnitz 16 Nov 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) For much of Vladimir Putin’s presidency, and especially since the 2011-12 Bolotnaya demonstrations, the Kremlin has claimed that Russia is threatened by internal enemies. Various actors have been singled out, including opposition activists, journalists, NGO representatives, and gay people. In many instances in which these groups are criticized, they are said to be sponsored by or doing the bidding of foreign—usually Western—...
Policy Memo # 547
Mark Kramer 16 Nov 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Over the past twenty years, observers such as Stephen F. Cohen have argued that relations between the United States and Russia have been plunged into a “new Cold War,” which Cohen attributes to the failure of U.S. policymakers to take account of Russian security interests. Cohen started using the “new Cold War” characterization long before other analysts did, but the Cold War metaphor has gained wide popularity over the past...
Policy Memo # 546
Lauren McCarthy, Noah Buckley 29 Oct 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Despite some recent, seemingly half-hearted efforts, the police remain one of Russia’s most unreformed bureaucracies and Russians’ trust in police has been low throughout the post-Soviet period. Survey data from the NGO Public Verdict and the Levada Center, which asked an annual question from 2010 to 2015 about whether respondents trust the police in their town or region, shows that in 2015 nearly half of respondents (47.2...
Policy Memo # 545
Anar Valiyev 26 Oct 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Over the last ten years, the United States has been gradually disengaging from the South Caucasus. This has tremendously affected the countries of the region, especially Georgia and Azerbaijan. The absence of the United States has left the region looking for alternative partners and investors such as Russia, Turkey, Iran, India, and China, with the latter being increasingly attentive toward the region since 2010 primarily due to...
Policy Memo # 544
(PONARS Policy Memo) In Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America’s Soviet Experts, historian David Engerman portrayed contemporary Russian and Eurasian studies as insular, ineffectual, and—ultimately—irrelevant. Charles King’s article in Foreign Affairs, “The Decline of Area Studies: Why Flying Blind Is Dangerous,” painted a bleak picture of area studies as financially flatlined, save for the lucky few working on issues of interest to the defense...
Policy Memo # 543
Andrej Krickovic 12 Oct 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) For many U.S. and Western observers, Russia has emerged as the most aggressive and assertive challenger to U.S. leadership and the American-led liberal world order. Russia’s annexation of Crimea and support for separatists in Eastern Ukraine confronts the long-standing prohibition against using force to make territorial changes, one of the hallmarks of the post-WWII international order. Its intervention in Syria goes against the...
Policy Memo # 542
Georgi Derluguian 09 Oct 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Last spring, a surging wave of protests ended a regime of post-Soviet restoration in Armenia. A near-universal rejection of the old regime brought into the streets of Yerevan students and elderly peasants, intellectuals and taxi drivers, ethnic Armenians and the minority Yezidis, even moms with babies in strollers. In the face of the incumbents’ indecision followed by hasty retreat, the protesting crowds burst into a triumphal...
Policy Memo # 541
Jordan Gans-Morse 04 Oct 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Both government agencies and civil society activists in Ukraine widely employ anti-corruption messaging such as billboards, posters, television advertisements, and trainings. But which messages, if any, are effective? Surprisingly, despite anti-corruption messaging’s widespread use, systematic evidence that it can effectively change hearts and minds is all but lacking. More perturbingly, scholars have shown how some type of...
Policy Memo # 540
Erica Marat 14 Sep 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) As a global leader in developing and using surveillance technologies, China is exporting its high-tech brand of authoritarianism to its neighbors in Eurasia. Chinese firms have been promoting their artificial intelligence (AI) and surveillance technologies and projects globally, and attracting customers in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Kazakhstan. All of the systems are part of the “...
Policy Memo # 539
Marlene Laruelle 05 Sep 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Over the past decade, and even more overtly since the annexation of Crimea, there has been a growing tendency to describe Russia—or at least the Putin regime—as “fascist.” On the political scene, this assessment has been articulated by everyone from Western policy leaders like former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson to Russian opponents of Vladimir Putin such as Garry Kasparov...

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