Posts by Eiki Berg

Eiki Berg 12-18-2018
(Routledge) (Edited by Eiki Berg and James Ker-Lindsay) This comprehensive volume is the first systematic effort to explore the ways in which recognised states and international organisations interact with secessionist ‘de facto states’, while maintaining the position that they are not regarded as independent sovereign actors in the international system. It is generally accepted by policy makers and scholars that some interaction with de facto states is...
Eiki Berg 08-03-2018
(Ethnopolitics) (Co-authored with Kristel Vits) There is lack of proper accounts of the foreign policy practices of de facto state authorities. There is no common understanding for whether de facto states have their own agency, or if these fledgling states are used as pawns within the context of wider strategic manoeuvring. This work proceeds from the assumption that de facto states are ‘states’ which, above all, seek to secure their physical survival,...
Eiki Berg 07-24-2018
(East European Politics) (Co-authored with Martin Mölder) This article focuses on prominent recent episodes where Russia has put sovereignty, the obligation to refrain (O2R) from using force, and self-determination to the test. Most recently in the Crimean context, we see that Russia’s systematic instrumental use of these norms does not contest the norms as such, but as their application becomes more contingent and arbitrary, their meaning is nevertheless...
Tags:
Eiki Berg 05-06-2016
Abstract: De facto states are conventionally perceived as illegal entities, usually ignored by the rest of the world and therefore also isolated and severely sanctioned in most cases. We investigate US foreign-policy engagement with Abkhazia, Nagorno-Karabakh, Northern Cyprus, Somaliland, and Transnistria and explore when, why, and how interactions between the United States and “places that do not exist” has taken place. This is done by extensively using...
Eiki Berg 08-12-2015
Over the last five years, Abkhazia has received more international attention than ever before in its over two decades of de facto statehood. In 2009 the West launched an engagement strategy paralleling Georgia’s own initiatives for dealing with Abkhazia. According to this strategy, Abkhazia was given the opportunity to engage with the West on a number of political, economic, social, and cultural issues, while leaving recognition as an independent state...

About the author

Professor of International Relations
University of Tartu, Estonia